Characters – Romance of the Three Kingdoms

He Jin, courtesy name Suigao, was a Chinese military general and politician. He was the military Grand Marshal and regent of the late Eastern Han dynasty of China. He was an elder half-brother of Empress He, the empress consort of Emperor Ling, and a maternal uncle of Emperor Shao. Wikipedia

Cao Ren, courtesy name Zixiao, was a military general serving during the late Eastern Han dynasty of China under the warlord Cao Cao, who was also his older second cousin. He continued serving in the state of Cao Wei – founded by Cao Cao’s son and successor, Cao Pi – during the Three Kingdoms period. Wikipedia

Xu You, courtesy name Ziyuan, was an adviser during the late Eastern Han dynasty of China. He served under the warlord Yuan Shao from 191 to 200 and then under the warlord and Grand chancellor of the Han Cao Cao from 200 until he was executed by the latter in 204 during the End of the Han dynasty. Wikipedia

Xu Chu (died c. 230), courtesy name Zhongkang, was a Chinese military general who lived during the late Eastern Han dynasty and the Three Kingdoms period of China. He started his career as a bodyguard to the warlord Cao Cao and later became a general in the state of Wei during the Three Kingdoms period. He was described to be a big and strong man, yet simple minded and honest, so he was nicknamed “Tiger Fool” by his men. After his death, he was posthumously honoured with the title “Marquis Zhuang”, which literally means “robust marquis”. Wikipedia

Liao Hua, courtesy name Yuanjian, originally named Liao Chun, was a military general of the state of Shu Han during the Three Kingdoms period of China. Like Zhang Yi and Zong Yu, Liao was one of few officials who served the Shu-Han state throughout its entire existence. Wikipedia

Zhong Hui, courtesy name Shiji, was a Chinese calligrapher, essayist, military general, and politician of the state of Cao Wei during the Three Kingdoms period of China. He was the younger son of Zhang Changpu with Zhong Yao, who served as the Grand Tutor in the Wei imperial court. Wikipedia

Lu Xun (183 – 19 March 245), courtesy name Boyan, also sometimes referred to as Lu Yi, was a Chinese military general and politician of the state of Eastern Wu during the Three Kingdoms period of China. He started his career as an official under the warlord Sun Quan in the 200s during the late Eastern Han dynasty and steadily rising through the ranks. In 219, he assisted Sun Quan’s general Lü Meng in an invasion of Jing Province, which led to the defeat and death of Liu Bei’s general Guan Yu. In 222, he served as the field commander of the Wu army in the Battle of Xiaoting against Liu Bei’s forces and scored a decisive victory over the enemy. Wikipedia

Deng Zhi, courtesy name Bomiao, was a government official, diplomat and military general of the state of Shu Han during the Three Kingdoms period of China. A descendant of Deng Yu, Deng Zhi started his career in the late Eastern Han dynasty under the warlord Liu Bei as a low-level officer in Pi County. Wikipedia

Gan Ning, courtesy name Xingba, was a Chinese military general serving under the warlord Sun Quan in the late Eastern Han dynasty. Originally a notorious pirate, he gave up the life of a marauder in the late 190s and became a subordinate of Huang Zu, the Administrator of a commandery in present-day east-central Hubei. Wikipedia

Li Dian, courtesy name Mancheng, was a Chinese military general and politician serving under the warlord Cao Cao during the late Eastern Han dynasty of China. He participated in the Battle of Guandu in 200 between Cao Cao and Yuan Shao. Wikipedia

Pang De, courtesy name Lingming, was a Chinese military general who lived during the late Eastern Han dynasty. He started his career under the warlord Ma Teng, who was based in Liang Province. Wikipedia

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